Marist victims abused in court

Marist victims abused in court Jailed: William Wade, known as Brother Christopher, outside Sydney District Court before he was jailed on Friday for child sex offences.
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Evidence: Brother Christopher giving evidence at a Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse public hearing in Newcastle in September, 2016.

Intimidating: Brother Christopher as a headmaster at Hamilton in the 1970s.

TweetFacebook Child sex victims abused in court as senior Marist jailedBrother Christopher sentenced for offences against two boysA FEMALE supporter of one of the Marist Brothers’ most senior educators hissed“rottensods” to his two child sex victims as he was jailed on Friday for offences four decades ago.

The verbal abuse helps explain why child sex victims can take many years to report the crimes, said one of Brother William Wade’s victims, who was sexually abused at Hamilton Marist school in 1976 when he was 13 and Wade was the headmaster known as Brother Christopher.

“He’s been convicted but they still don’t believe he did it. These men have always had their believers. What hope would a kid have had back then if he’d said Brother Christopher did these things to me?” said the man.

Wade, 81, was sentenced to 18 months’ jail, with a minimum sentence of nine months, after he was found guilty in a judge-alone trial of three counts of indecently assaulting two boys at Hamilton Marist school, and Kogarah Marist school in 1980.

Sydney District Court Judge David Arnott accepted his victims’ evidence that Wade sexually abused them in his school offices after both boys turned to him for help when they were sick and in pain.

Wade sexually abused his first victim after the boy complained of feeling sick and was taken into the headmaster’s office by a female school administrative staff member, who left the boy in the office and shut the door.

Wade called the boy to him with the words: “Come and sit on my knee darling, and tell me all about it.”

Wade put his arm around the boy’s waist and his hand down his shorts where he fondled the boy’s genitals.

Judge Arnott accepted evidence that Wade committed a similar act at the Kogarah school four years later when a boy in severe pain with a twisted testicle was taken into the headmaster’s office and the door was shut.

Wade asked the boy if he could see his genitals and knelt in front of him.

“He said words to the effect of ‘This might help you’, and putthe boy’s penis in his mouth,” Judge Arnott said.

Hospital records showed the boy was admitted to St George Hospital later that day for treatment.

The two men separately reported the offences to police in July, 2015 and July, 2016, when Wade was charged.

One of his victims cried outside the court while talking about the impact of child sex offences on people’s lives, after the court heard he had still not told his mother of the sexual abuse.

“People don’t understand the damage it does to the victims. Even after all these years it still affects me. And it’s not just the victims themselves who are affected. For every victim there’s layers of other victims. The families. The suicides.”

The “Rotten sods” comment from one of Wade’s supporters was a shock, but not a surprise.

“What are these people thinking? That we made this up? That we went through all this, for what?”

Wade’s earliest release date is August 2, 2018. Judge Arnott said he was required to sentence him under the sentences that applied at the time of the offences.

Wade was an “opportunistic” offender who committed gross breaches of trust against his victims, and relied on his authority and position as a headmaster to silence the boys, the judge said.

The Sydney areas that boast the best auction success

Clearance rates are a statistic that vendors hold in high regard, perhaps increasingly so considering that Sydney experienced a quarterly price reduction of 1.9 per cent to $1.17 million during the three months leading up to September.
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September was a turning point for Sydney, when house prices produced the second-worst performance of Australia’s major cities for the quarter. It fell just behind the volatile Darwin market, which moved backwards by 3.6 per cent.

Moderating prices are likely to spark an element of nervousness among spring vendors who are mid-way through an auction campaign. However, once the statistics are drilled down, we see that the impact on Sydney regions has varied.

The number of houses sold at auction in Sydney declined 18 per cent in the September quarter compared with the June 2017 quarter. This fell across all regions apart from the Central Coast. The number of houses sold under the hammer during this period is still 6.4 per cent above the results from the September 2016 quarter.

Annually, all Sydney regions experienced a boost to the volume of houses sold at auction, apart from the city and east, the inner west and the upper north shore.

The highest clearance rate was in the northern beaches and the city and east at 70 per cent. The northern beaches was one of only two regions to reach a higher clearance rate compared with the June 2017 quarter, rising marginally from 69 per cent.

The central coast also recorded an improved quarterly clearance rate, from 52 per cent in June to 53 per cent in September.

Relatively robust clearance rates were recorded in the lower north shore and the inner west, at 68 per cent and 67 per cent, respectively, although that was significantly lower than the 82 per cent and 86 per cent achieved last year.

The lower north shore had the highest median price at $2.4 million, based on properties auctioned throughout the September quarter.

If 70 per cent is the benchmark to determine a seller’s market, technically only two regions fall within this category: the city and east, and the northern beaches.

The upper north shore (63 per cent), the south (62 per cent), Canterbury Bankstown (59 per cent) and the West (57 per cent) recorded lower clearance rates compared with last year’s September quarter.

The south west had the second-lowest auction median price at $814,000, scraping by with a clearance rate of 50 per cent.

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Hunters Hill landmark of radio’s Sturge Harty on offer

In Hunters Hill, the 1874-built mansion of the late 2GB radio presenter Frank Sturge Harty and his wife Delphine, Wybalena House, is for sale for the first time in 35 years.
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The historic property was built for Hunters Hill mayor and steamboat proprietor Charles Jeanneret for his wife Julia Ann and their 11 children, and was one of more than a dozen such villas built by him on the peninsula.

The Hartys bought it from Sydney University in 1982 for $650,000, and it has returned to the market following the death of Delphine Harty two years ago, aged 105.

Darren Curtis and Martin Ross, of Christie’s International, have a price guide of $7 million to $7.5 million.

The listing replaces Wahroonga’s heritage home Red Hall on the high-end shelf after it was sold after three weeks on the market.

Rumour has it a buyer from China snapped up the home of the late transport and logistics industry boss John Strang, AO, and his widow Allison, for close to the $8 million high hopes.

Settlement will confirm the result given the tight lips of Christie’s Darren Curtis and Martin Ross. Related: Scott Sutton sells trophy home for $7.3m+Related: Watsons Bay semi sells for $14mRelated: Comedian Andy Lee sells in inner westGarden guru buys in Bowral

Jeanne Villani, one of the owners of the City Extra restaurants at Circular Quay, is joining the Southern Highlands set, paying $2,375,000 for the Victorian Gothic house Highdown in Bowral.

Records show the Hansel & Gretel-style residence in Notts Hill, next door to arts aficionado Justin Miller, was sold by lawyer Anna Lungershausen through Drew Lindsay, of his eponymous agency. The Hansel and Gretel-style residence known as Highdown in Bowral. Photo: Supplied

Villani is widely acclaimed among Sydney green thumbs for the extraordinary garden at her Bayview home, Waterfall Cottage, which is likely to hit the market soon.

Meanwhile, veteran media boss George Buschman and his wife Belinda have returned to the Southern Highlands, buying the Windemere property in Avoca through Drew Lindsay for $3 million.

It is a return home for the couple who have owned notable rural residences Patchdale and Highfield Park.

The tree-change comes as the couple pocket $5.9 million for their Vaucluse home through Belle’s James Nixon, less than two years after they bought it for $4.7 million. The Southern Highlands property of lawyer Anna Lungershausen sold for $2,375,000. Photo: SuppliedGlanworth reno plans lodged

Media tycoon Kerry Stokes is planning a makeover for his Darling Point waterfront trophy home Glanworth.

Plans lodged with Woollahra Council outline a Heather Buttrose Associates-renovation that includes a new study, lift, terrace and a pergola, all to the tune of $544,000. Media tycoon Kerry Stokes is planning to renovate his Darling Point property. Photo: Trevor Collens

The billionaire chairman of Seven West Media has owned the American antebellum-style home at the northern most tip of Darling Point since 1998, when it was sold by Singapore businessman Ho Whye Chung for $9.5 million.

Odds are Stokes is planning to spend more time at his Darling Point base now that son Ryan and his new wife Claire are set to move into their Federation house Rilworth, which they bought earlier this year for $16 million in time for Christmas. Halvorsen family selling up

The Wahoonga residence Skaugum, built by the boat-building mogul Harold Halvorsen in 1950, is for sale, ending 67 years of family ownership.

Named after the official residence of the Crown Prince of Norway – and having played host to Norway’s now King Harald in 1974 – the property features timber floors, architraves, skirting and staircase bannisters that were built in the Halvorsen boatsheds. Skaugum in Wahroonga goes to auction on December 7. Photo: Supplied

Following Harold Halvorsen’s death in 2000, at the age of 90, the property was inherited by son Harvey Halvorsen and his wife Nancy.

“Now we are moving to the United States, where we spend a lot of the year already,” Nancy Halvorsen says. “We feel it is time for another family to enjoy the estate and make new memories.”

Ray White Turramurra’sDavid Walker is asking $4.5 million ahead of the December 7 auction. The sale will mark the end of 67 years of family ownership. Photo: SuppliedEight figures for empty block

Accountant Anthony Calabro has sold his 1300 square metre patch of dirt in Vaucluse for $10.15 million.

The double block by Nielsen Park was bought by budding property developers and brothers-in-law Ben Krimotat and Elon Zizer amid talk they could build their own family compound on the site. Or something. Anthony Calabro has sold his Vaucluse block for $10.15 million. Photo: Supplied

Warren Ginsberg, of Ray White Double Bay, declined to reveal the exact price but records show the property last traded for $7 million in 2011 and late that year, just days before the family was scheduled to move in, the six-bedroom house burnt down. M&C Saatchi boss on the moveTom Dery is selling his Paddington terrace. Photo: Supplied

No sooner had M&C Saatchi’s Tom Dery stepped down from his role as worldwide chairman, remaining Australian chairman of the advertising giant, than he also listed his Paddington terrace.

The Victorian-era house, with separate guest cottage and a lap pool, last traded in 2009 for $3.8 million.

It returns to the market for $5 million with Jason Boon, of Richardson & Wrench Elizabeth Bay-Potts Point. Dery hopes to snag $5 million for the residence. Photo: Supplied

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Woman stole more than $1 million: police

Newcastle courthouse. A REDHEAD woman who stole more than $1 million from a waste management company over an eight-year period created three separate bank accounts to siphon offthe funds, according to court documents.
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Sonia Gai Ambler, 53, has pleaded guilty to stealing property as a clerk greater than $15,000 after a number of other fraud charges were withdrawn.

Ambler, who is represented by solicitor Mandy Hull, did not appear in Newcastle District Court on Thursday and the matter was adjourned to April when she will be sentenced.

Ambler was employed as an administration assistant for EMS Group Pty Ltd, a subsidiary of major environmental and waste management companyVeolia Environmental Services Australia Pty Ltd, between July 2001 and December 2014 according to court documents.

During her employment, Ambler worked from a warehouse, operated by EMS Group, in Aruma Place, Cardiff.But between June 2006 and when her employment was terminated at the end of 2014, Ambler stole more than $1 million from Veolia, court documents state.

Veloia managementdiscovered that payments totalling $1,181,875 that had been made to the vendors “Toronto Plumbing” and “Concut Pty Ltd” had actually been made to Ambler’s personal bank account.

The company conducted an internal investigation using a forensic accountant who identified that on 855 occasions Ambler had transferred funds into three separate ANZ bank accounts under the guise of payment to the vendors.

Lake Macquarie detectives say that the three accounts were opened and managed by Ambler with the sole purpose of defrauding the company.

After her termination from EMS Group Pty Ltd, Ambler was subject to civil action by Veolia in a bid to recoup the stolen funds, according to court documents.

The proceedings were finalised in the NSW Supreme Court in 2015, with Justice Rowan Drake finding in favour of Veolia and ordering Ambler repay $1,018,418.28, according to court documents.

However, according to Justice Media records, the matter was discontinued in August, 2015, and any “asset preservation orders” were dissolved.

Ambler was arrestedat her Redhead home in November 2016 and providedlittle explanation as to why she had stolen money over the years, other than to say she “was going through a bit of a nervous breakdown” and was living beyond her means.

Mystery as Maloney leaves camp hours before World Cup clash

Kangaroos star James Maloney has reportedly finalised a deal to move to the Penrith Panthers in a major player swap deal which will see Matt Moylan join Cronulla.
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Maloney has walked out of the Kangaroos’ World Cup camp just hours before their pool game against France in Canberra on Friday night.

Fairfax Media revealed last month the Panthers were keen to secure a swap deal with the Sharks with Maloney and Moylan to trade places.

The Panthers have lodged a three-year deal for Maloney to move to Penrith, which could be announced as early as Monday.

The contract will need to be cleared by the NRL, but it appears the speculation over Moylan’s future is all but over.

Moylan is set to link with the Sharks on a four-year deal. NRL南京夜网 is reporting the deal will be worth $3.6 million.

The Panthers are seeking clarification over a third-party agreement that is attached to Moylan’s current deal with them.

Maloney was supposed to be playing against France at Canberra Stadium on Friday but was granted leave from camp for personal reasons.

It left the Kangaroos scrambling to replace him, with Ben Hunt also granted leave from camp to get married this weekend.

Cameron Munster looms as the most likely man to replace in the halves alongside Michael Morgan, with Cooper Cronk being rested this week.

Dane Gagai has been called into the 19-man match day squad for Australia, leaving Valentine Holmes, Matt Gillett and Boyd Cordner on an extended bench.

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